A Few Facts About Great Leaders

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The key to building a great team in any setting is to be great leaders. Great leaders are in the making, moving from a good leader to a great leader.

Good leaders know they must prepare themselves, better themselves, make changes, and keep growing. The leader’s desire for positive change will determine the level of leadership achieved.

Greatness largely due to bravery and courage in escaping from restrictive old ideas, hindering old standards, and a mere respectable way of doing things. Here are five facts about great leaders.

1. Great leaders are always growing and reaching to improve their leadership. Take responsibility for your own failures as well as successes. If you keep learning, you will improve, and your leadership will get better. It’s ok to not be okay, but it’s not ok to stay there. Because the greatest fault is to be conscious of none.

2. Great leaders are pushing the boundary lines to move beyond what is normal or usual. Leaders are pioneers. They venture into unexplored territory and help guide others to new and often unfamiliar destinations.

The person who is afraid to risk failure seldom has to face success. We should expected team members to make mistakes, but only as long as they are mistakes of commission. A mistake of commission happens when you are doing what should be done but don’t get the results you want.

3. Great leaders are risk-takers. They reject the maintenance mentality and take risks from strength, preparing thoroughly, understanding what is at stake, and marching forward with confidence. It is never too late to be what you might have become as long as there is air in your lungs!

He who has never failed cannot be great. Failure is the true test of greatness. Great leadership is great stewardship – the cultivation of resources that God has entrusted us for His glory. The idea of Sabbath in particular gives us both theological and practical help in managing one of our primary resources: time.

It is better to make a thousand failures than to be too cowardly to ever undertake anything. For we can be certain that God will give us the strength and resources we need to live through any situation in life that he ordains. The will of God will never take us where the grace of God cannot sustain us.

4. Great leaders are resource finders and releasers. They have built a leadership structure that finds potential leaders, helps to train them, and then releases them to greater levels of work. Great leaders help others to also become leaders; they serve and assist others to help them improve, grow, and actualize their ambitions.

5. Great leaders are future-focused and dedicated to do whatever it takes to get there. They give the present work at hand their full attention and energy while maintaining a healthy perspective of something greater to work towards. Their faith capacity has increased to believe that God will provide all that is necessary as their need arises. God will always provide; but what He provides will be what is needed, not necessarily what is wanted.

A great leader’s “people capacity” is also increased so that getting along with and caring for people is at the leader’s heart. Having a heart for people and faith in God’s ability gives the great leader strong confidence to focus on the vision and devote his resources to seeing that vision through to its completion.

It is not because things are difficult that we do not dare, but it is because we do not dare that they are difficult. We should all take the challenge to move from being a good leader to a great one and expand our leadership capacity.

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Basketball: Without the Basketball

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There are some things about the game of basketball that we all know and fully comprehend, but sometimes we don’t seem to notice all the implications of that basic, simple, and common knowledge. For example, we all know that there is only one basketball used to play with in a game. During an organized league game there are ten players on the court, with five players on each team actively playing. Only one player can control or have possession of the basketball at any given moment. Only one player at a time can dribble or shoot the ball. In whatever the league, however long the quarter or half is played, there will always be nine players who are playing the game without the ball currently in their hands. This obvious knowledge can actually tell us a lot more about this great game.

As a player, it is very important to have good ball-handling skills, to make moves with the basketball in order to avoid having it stolen, to make clean passes, and to be able to shoot well. However, 9 out of 10 players on the court will be playing without the ball in their hands at every given moment of the game. So the chances are pretty high for any particular player to not have the ball for the vast majority of the game. This leads us to realize that there is going to be a great necessity for understanding and playing the game without having a basketball in your hands.

So again, during the game, all but one of the players will be moving without the basketball. This means that your skill level to dribble and shoot the ball are only part of the game. While those parts are very essential and require a lot of time and effort to develop and refine, the majority of the time during a game actually consists of how well you play without the ball in your hands. It won’t be that great of a value to a team if you can shoot lights out, but you are slow, don’t play defense well, can’t even get open on offense, and just seem to get in the way by being out of position when the ball isn’t in your hands.

Remember… movement is life. If you’re not moving, you’re not living. (And don’t be silly or pedantic; even when you are sleeping or just standing still, your heart is beating and body parts are operating internally to keep you alive.) In the game of basketball, we are required to have constant ball movement, but also constant movement without the ball. All this movement without the ball must still have an actual purpose. All five players on the court should constantly be working together as one unit, with one common goal: score more points than the other team. Whether the ball is in your hands or not, there are aspects of the game that go well beyond your ability to manipulate a round, orange object. Here are some absolutes for the game when there isn’t a ball in your hands:

1. Each player should always know where the ball is at on the court and who has the ball.

2. Each player should be anticipating what others players are about to do and where the ball might possibly go next.

3. Each player should be comfortable setting screens and coming off screens.

4. Each player on offense should be looking to get open for a pass, or set someone else up to get open. We should be spread out or bunched up tactfully in order to create the right spacing needed for the best possible quality shot.

5. Every player needs good court vision. We must survey the court and quickly process where everyone is, where they are headed, and how to exploit any holes or weaknesses in the opposing team.

6. Each player should be moving on offense, not just the point guard bringing the ball down. Whether you are setting a screen, setting your defender up for a screen, flashing through the lane, posting up on the block, darting up to the top of the key, rotating to the backside, drawing the defense away from another player to set up an opening, or sliding up to the elbow to create better spacing during a set play, you should always be moving.

7. Whenever the ball is shot, the ball becomes fair game on a miss, and you should want that rebound. We should all be crashing the boards; this is not merely the job or role of a post player. Anyone and everyone is allowed to rebound the basketball, not just the 4 or 5 position.

8. Every player should be hustling up and down the court on both offense and defense. No team can function properly if all five guys are cherry-picking or snowbirding on every single possession; somebody has to rebound the ball after all. We have to fill the lanes and run on offense, but we must also do the same on defense. On the way back downcourt, everyone should be locating where their man is, where the ball is, if anyone is out of position, and if help is needed on the ball or an opponent who is currently a wide open threat.

9. On defense we should always know where our man is at when we are in man-to-man, and always know who is in our area when we are in a zone defense. You’re going to have to move to cover your man or area; zone defense does not mean we all stand flat-footed in a 2-3 or 1-3-1 formation; you are guarding a general area and working together as a unit in a zone formation to prevent penetration into the paint.

10. You’re on defense, and you want the ball back… so you should be trying to get the ball back.

Players on defense obviously won’t have the ball and will need to do their best to get the ball back; and hopefully do so without the other team scoring any points first. We should be using our heads more than our hands to get the ball back from an opponent. We can get quicker by running suicides and defensive slides all practice, but I’m sure most of us would rather become “quicker” by using our heads.

We want to work and play smarter, not just harder. Our defensive positioning, hands up and moving around at all times, getting low and wide on ball coverage, slapping up on the ball while being dribbled by our opponent instead of down, disrupting passes with our backhand instead of compromising our position, constant communication with our teammates, putting pressure on the ball, contesting shots, anticipating where the ball will bounce on a missed shot, blocking out on rebounds, and going for the ball with reckless abandon when it is loose are all key components to playing the game well… and none of that has to do with how well you can dribble, pass, or shoot the basketball. We need to learn to play well without the basketball.

Grace-driven effort & Sanctification

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Every truly sane person can agree something has gone wrong with the world. The problem comes from within. It is the self-centeredness of the human heart. The Christian calls this problem sin. The Bible teaches that everyone is a sinner by nature. We are what is wrong with the world. In fact, these evils that come from the heart make us so unclean that Jesus tells His disciples:

“And if your hand causes you to sin, cut it off. It is better for you to enter life crippled than with two hands to go to hell, to the unquenchable fire. And if your foot causes you to sin, cut it off. It is better for you to enter life lame than with two feet to be thrown into hell. And if your eye causes you to sin, tear it out. It is better for you to enter the kingdom of God with one eye than with two eyes to be thrown into hell, ‘where their worm does not die and the fire is not quenched.'” – Mark 9:43-48 (ESV)

Sinful behavior (the reference to hand and foot) and sinful desires (the reference to the eye) are like a fire that has broken out in your living room. Let’s say a cushion on your couch has ignited. You cannot just sit there and say, “Well, the whole house isn’t burning – it’s just a cushion on the sofa. We’re all safe and sound.” If you don’t do something immediately and decisively about the cushion, the whole house will eventually become engulfed. Fire is never satisfied. It can’t be allowed to smolder; it can’t be confined to a corner. It will overtake you eventually. Sin is the same way: It never stays in its place. It always leads to separation from God, which results in intense suffering, first in this life and then in the next. The Bible calls that hell. That’s why Jesus uses the drastic image of amputation. There can be no compromise. We must do anything we can to avoid it: If our foot causes us to sin, we should cut it off. If it’s our eye, we should cut it out.

“People do not drift toward holiness. Apart from grace-driven effort, people do not gravitate toward godliness, genuine care for their neighbor through acts of kindness and generosity, prayer and obedience to Scripture, faith and delight in the Lord. We drift toward compromise and call it tolerance; we drift toward disobedience and call it freedom; we drift toward superstition and call it faith; we cherish the indiscipline of lost self-control and call it relaxation; we slouch toward prayerlessness and delude ourselves into thinking we have escaped legalism; we slide toward godlessness and convince ourselves we have been liberated.”

Grace-driven effort is violent. It is rage-filled and violent. And those are not the words that usually accompany Christianity. Now this isn’t violence towards another person; this is violence towards that residual sin inside of us. For those who have been made alive in Christ, our nature is a holy nature, and it hates the residual effects of sin. It wants it to die. It wants to put it to death. It’s not going to give it quarter, it’s not going to give it room, it doesn’t just want to starve and control it, it wants it dead. This is the one situation where the Christian can just channel a little Al Capone; because they want their sin DEAD, they want the motives of their sin DEAD, and they want every thing that leads to sin burned to the GROUND. Grace-driven effort wants to murder (which is this word in the Greek that means to murder) and put to death these things. It wants to murder sin in our heart and will be diligent to put said sin to death until it is dead. It is very serious about mortifying the flesh. It is very serious about putting to death wicked thoughts and wicked ambitions, both seen and unseen. And for the bulk of you, most of what you will wrestle with will be unseen. Most people won’t see it.

What I have found is that the legalist more often than not doesn’t necessarily want to put their sin to death; they just want to control it. They want to train it. They don’t necessarily want it to die. Here is how it shows back up. Because you don’t want to murder it and because you want it to be your pet, when you get tired and frustrated and angry or when you feel entitled and somebody isn’t giving you what you think you are owed, you run to that sin for comfort rather than to the God of the universe for comfort. This is why so many of get stuck in this cycle of sin where you do really well for a season and then you fall back into it. It’s because you haven’t tried to kill it and put it to death. You have simply tried to train it.

So here’s what happens. It’s almost like when the trained animals turn on their trainers in an episode of “When Animals Attack.” We have a little pet sin, and we think we’ve got it controlled. Then it turns on us and destroys us and we are thinking, “This is crazy. Where did this come from? How did this happen?” Well you gave quarter to something that you can’t really control in the end. And for all the bravado, “I’ve taught him to sit. I’ve taught him to roll over. I’ve taught him to beg. I’ve taught him to shake. I’ve taught him to speak.” For all the “I’ve controlled him,” it only takes the right circumstance or the right setting for him to turn and do what he was created to do, which is deceive you and destroy you and kill you and lie to you. You buy in, and you’re right back to square one. So grace-driven effort is violent, because it understands that the lion is out to destroy. The lion is seeking someone to devour. The man of the house understands that if he is devoured, there are other people that are wounded by him being devoured. There is collateral damage to his failure as a man. So he puts the lion down. He doesn’t just starve him; he starves him to death. He doesn’t strike him once; he strikes him and strikes him and strikes him and will not quit hitting until he’s dead. He doesn’t just assume he is dead, he then rips out the heart and cuts off the head. Next he piles on the wood and gasoline, and he burns what is left until nothing remains. He fiercely and mercilessly destroys the lion until there is literally nothing left to kill. This is how we are to address the sin in our lives.

Because again, grace-driven effort is violent. I think some of the reasons that a lot of us have been stuck in frustration for a long time is that we are simply not violent enough towards our sin. We have somehow said that these sins are respectable sins or they will fade away in time. You have said, “These things I can deal with.” But you forget that out of the same heart that would harbor anger, malice, and slander comes murder, wickedness, lust, and deceit. An idolatrous heart leads to idolatrous actions. It explodes like a volcano that’s dormant if you’re not careful.

The Gospel needs to be the foundation for everything we know and believe; one major reason for this, is that the gospel creates a holy people. Because, as we know, people don’t just stumble into godliness; they don’t spontaneously wake up one day knowing Jesus deeply and pursuing the conformity that Jesus commands and the Spirit empowers. However, we should be very weary of giving people checklists and must refuse to lay a weight on people that Jesus didn’t. Paul uses great phrases to describe our growth into holiness and reflecting the Glory of God and His reign and rule over our lives. Paul talks about “training ourselves in righteousness” (1st Timothy 4:7), “laboring in prayer,” “running to win,” “counting it all a loss” (Philippians 3), and “beating his body” (1st Corinthians 9:26-27). This language doesn’t paint the picture of sitting on the couch and “falling” into godliness.

“… heaven isn’t a place for those who fear hell – it’s a place for those who love God…”

One of the biggest problems with most of those who claim to know and love God, and want to see sin lose its power in their lives and walk in greater intimacy with Christ is that they are exhausted and have been trying to mortify sin by promises and threats rather than through the weapons grace provides. By “promises” I mean they believe that they will have life to the “full” and get a great house in heaven if they behave in this manner or that manner. In the DFW area, this plays itself out with church attendance and comparing ourselves to others. If I go to church frequently and am better than I was a couple years ago or if I’m better than other people who attend my church then I must be good. We love to compare our strengths to others’ weaknesses and grow confident in our goodness. By “threats” I mean that many of us try to behave and modify our behavior because we fear hell and God’s wrath, not because we love Christ and desire more of Him. We try to modify our behavior so we can earn our way out of hell. The problem with this is that heaven isn’t a place for those who fear hell – it’s a place for those who love God.

Another very popular sport in the Bible belt is fighting residual sin with our own vows and resolution – these become our defense. In the end, you are simply pitting sin against sin and in that scenario you lose. We fight sin and grow in godliness by using the weapons grace provides. There are at least three:

Weapons of Grace:

1. The Word of God

“All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, that the man of God may be competent, equipped for every good work.” – 2nd Timothy 3:16-17

The Holy Spirit illumines the Scriptures as the storehouse of weaponry in the battle against sin and for godliness; all that we need to stand and fight are found with in its pages. The reason I think so many people stumble about when it comes to residual sin and maturing in Christ is they have no idea what the Scriptures say when it comes to those subjects. The Scriptures are where we find and are trained to do battle in such a way that victory is found.

2. The Blood of Christ

“But now in Christ Jesus you who once were far off have been brought near by the blood of Christ.” – Ephesians 2:13

One of the reasons Paul constantly preaches the gospel to people who already know and believe it is the human tendency to run back to the law instead of trusting in the blood of Christ to cleanse them from all unrighteousness. You see this especially in Galatians 2:20-3:5. When we stumble and fall we run to God not from Him. This is made possible by having God’s wrath removed from us and absorbed by Christ and Christ’s righteousness imputed to us. A mark of Christian maturity and genuine Gospel understanding is not running away from God to clean yourself up and then come back but a broken and contrite spirit that runs to Him asking Him for forgiveness and strength.

3. The Promises of the Covenant

“Therefore He is the mediator of a new covenant, so that those who are called may receive the promised eternal inheritance, since a death has occurred that redeems them from the transgressions committed under the first covenant.” – Hebrews 9:15

If the 10 Commandments were a quiz or test I easily fail. I’ve been guilty of every one of them. One of the reasons the law was given was to be a diagnostic tool to show me I can’t be perfect, that I’m going to fall short, and that I am in desperate need of a Savior (Romans 1-7). When we stumble and fall the Spirit reminds us of the Scriptures that promise that there has been a death for those failures and that there is a new covenant resting on Christ now and not on my ability to obey the law. This allows me to pursue Christ without fear and by “beholding His glory I am transformed.”

[This blog consists of reflections and content that has been adapted from material and sermons by pastors Tim Keller of Redeemer Presbyterian, and Matt Chandler of The Village Church.]

Related articles:

“Gospel-driven Sanctification” by Justin Holcomb

“Gospel-driven Sanctification” by Jerry Bridges

“Real Hope for Real Change” by Matt Moore

Related Video Discussions:

“John Piper and Tim Keller Wrestle with Sanctification: Part 1” by: Desiring God ministries

“John Piper and Tim Keller Wrestle with Sanctification: Part 2” by: Desiring God ministries

Salt & Light

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“… About that time there arose no little disturbance concerning the Way. For a man named Demetrius, a silversmith, who made silver shrines of Artemis, brought no little business to the craftsmen. These he gathered together, with the workmen in similar trades, and said, “Men, you know that from this business we have our wealth. And you see and hear that not only in Ephesus but in almost all of Asia this Paul has persuaded and turned away a great many people, saying that gods made with hands are not gods. And there is danger not only that this trade of ours may come into disrepute but also that the temple of the great goddess Artemis may be counted as nothing, and that she may even be deposed from her magnificence, she whom all Asia and the world worship.” When they heard this they were enraged and were crying out, “Great is Artemis of the Ephesians!” So the city was filled with the confusion, and they rushed together into the theater, dragging with them Gaius and Aristarchus, Macedonians who were Paul’s companions in travel…” – Acts 19:23-29

The message of the Gospel has the power to transform the world for the glory of God and for the good of all people. We see in history, especially from the record we have in the book of Acts, that because of people who believed in Jesus subversively, over a period of time, the very moral fiber and business practices of a continent were transformed, not by getting the government to legislate it, but rather by the people who believed in the good news of the Gospel being the salt and light of Christ in the world.

One of the things I’ve seen in this weird Christian subculture that is so disturbing and prevalent in the United States today, is the odd characteristic that so few who claim faith in Christ want to share the gospel to everyone, or with anyone, rather they want to gripe about the government’s failure to uphold our values instead. Give me a break, please, give us all a break from that ignorant ideology. It has never worked that way. It never will work that way. It’s as if we as Christians have never studied Roman history… or any history for that matter.

When the Roman Emperor Constantine declared, “We’re a Christian nation now,” he wasn’t legislating faith, but announcing and acknowledging something that had already taken roots in the Roman Empire. His declaration takes place after Christianity has already spread throughout the Roman Empire and become the dominate faith among the people. Christianity wasn’t legislated or forced upon the nation. (Besides, wasn’t it like 100 years later that Rome ceased to exist?) It doesn’t work that way. You cannot legislate Christianity. Nor can you legislate morality. That’s all a pipe dream. We think we can get people behaving better with laws and strict rules that govern a country? Really?! So then we’ll get better behaving people outside the kingdom of God? People following strict rules and obeying rigid legislation, yet not having any relationship with or love for our God? But some argue this would at least create a safer place for our children… No, it’s a rough place out there no matter what the law says. So, what if instead of saying, “When is our government going to do this, do that, pass this law, abolish this law, blah, blah, blah…” What if we just did what the Bible asks us to do and be salt and light, and grace-filled people in a lost and dying world? What if we tried it that way?

“But seek the welfare of the city where I have sent you into exile, and pray to the LORD on its behalf, for in its welfare you will find your welfare.” – Jeremiah 29:7

What if we thought through the implications of grace and let that beautiful truth motivate us to engage the world and seek their good? What if we stopped boycotting stuff constantly, and criticizing everyone who lives contrary to how we believe we should live and showed them love and grace instead? What if instead of drawing up signs to stand outside movies like “The DaVinci Code?” What if instead, we actually saw them? What if we actually paid $14.50 or whatever it costs to go to a movie now; went and saw it, but saw it through the lenses of Scripture so we could better discuss things with our neighbors? Why? Because they’re going to see it. Heck, go with them! What if we stopped making Christianity about beer and rated-R movies? What if we did that? What if we didn’t make our measure of faith and devotion about where we get our chicken sandwiches? What if we let the peripherals be the peripherals and concentrated on the gospel? What if we quit being ignorant moralists trying to police everybody and started trusting the grace and mercy of Jesus Christ to be enough? What if we said, “Hey, we are missionaries in our own neighborhoods, we don’t have to go on a special trip overseas to tell people the good news of Christ Jesus.” What if we did that?

What if we created an environment where you’re welcome to come as you are? What if we didn’t expect people to perfectly live a certain way before we’d have them at our house for dinner? What if we didn’t go, “Oh, you believe in Jesus, well then, here’s some soup.” But rather are posture was, “We believe in Christ Jesus and the work He has accomplished for us, so here is some soup, and how else may we serve you?” What if we wouldn’t beat people up with the gospel and just shared the love of Christ? You can’t save anybody. That’s God’s business, but you can be salt and light. What if we did it that way? What if we tried to do it differently, or maybe originally? What if we went underground, one heart at a time, one neighborhood? And I’m not talking about proselytizing, I’m talking about living the gospel of Christ, having people to your house and praying.

I’m not saying we apologize for who we are, or for what we believe, but rather display it like we mean it. What if we prayed for our dinner no matter who was at the table? We’re not trying to convert a guest by our prayer at dinner, like, “Father, we thank You for this pagan. And we thank You that You could save him if he would but listen. In Romans 8, You say…” No, instead: “Thank You for this food, thank You for Your Son, all the beautiful common grace You have given us, and the grace upon grace You show us daily,” because we thank Him for the food and we thank Him for friendships and we eat. What if that’s how we viewed this thing? What if instead of spending all our money on bigger and nicer church buildings… what if our churches didn’t do the “Oh, once we’re at 75% capacity for one service, let’s build a building that gets us into horrific debt so that we can no longer concentrate on doing what’s good and right in the world?”

“Behold, this was the guilt of your sister Sodom: she and her daughters had pride, excess of food, and prosperous ease, but did not aid the poor and needy. They were haughty and did an abomination before Me. So I removed them, when I saw it.” – Ezekiel 16:49-50 [also reference Isaiah 1:10-31]

What if churches that were growing exponentially just bit the bullet and kept adding services before finally breaking down and using funds that have been saved (and/or pledged) to build a new building that could accommodate the growth. What if churches didn’t go into crazy debt to build an enormous building that sits empty 6 days a week? What if they built a building that didn’t have seat warmers, a rock wall, or a coffee shop in it, have a separate school so our kids didn’t have to rub elbows with a bunch of little heathen hoodlums in public school, along with a series of basketball courts, bookstores, and the nicest amenities money can buy?

There is absolutely nothing wrong with having those things in a church building, there’s nothing inherently wrong with atractional-based ministry, but what if there happens to be a Lifetime Fitness, 24-hour Fitness, L.A. Fitness, YMCA, Gold’s Gym, etc. all nearby and they already have accessible basketball courts? Maybe we could go play ball in the public gyms rub elbows with people who don’t know the gospel? What if the public school systems would benefit more from having your kids in them, and you rolling up your sleeves to join in the mess in an effort to help and serve the community?

Maybe instead of going to church to get your six shots of espresso or your triple latte, maybe you should just pick a Starbucks. Seriously, there’s probably at least 20 of them in your immediate area. Maybe you could learn your barrista’s name and begin to pray for them. What if we did that instead of spending fifty grand to have a coffee shop in the church building? Why don’t we go to the same restaurants every week and ask for the same waitresses and waiters? (And tip them well, and quit being cheap!) Why don’t we throw block parties? When did we as Christians become the anti-partiers?! In Leviticus 23, God says, “If you don’t party, I will kill you.” Read it. Why don’t we put up some stuff in the yard, gather some good friends together, set out a bunch of food and drinks, and throw a party for the neighborhood? Why don’t we be those people? And I’m not talking about getting out of control, and throwing wild parties that lead to debauchery. But why aren’t we celebrating life and all the common grace to be enjoyed with some BBQ and a game of corn-hole?

I’m simply talking about instead of going, “This is who we are, and if you want to know more about us, you should come to Sunday School with me at 7:00am on your one day off from work.” What if instead of doing that, we just started to engaged people where they were? What if we did it that way? Well, if you did that, you wouldn’t need so many church programs, would you? What if you went more bare bones with meeting space for the church? This would mean you could save a ton of money and put it towards something else, maybe something a little more constructive. What could one do with a million dollars they saved from not having twenty separate Bible study programs going on every single day of the week and an enormous building with a coffee shop, book store, restaurant, post office, school, and basketball gyms? Maybe start a hospital, or school, or sponsor children over seas through a trusted program, or feed more people that would otherwise go hungry, or supply medicine and medical treatment to those in need, or something like that? What if we tried it that way? And what if it overflowed out of the little area you live in, to the farthest parts of the Earth?

What if we didn’t apologize for what the Bible says or for what we believe, but we were more quick to acknowledge and grieve the church’s historical failure to always operate and serve in Christ-like love and humility? What if we admitted that we’re human too, and we will likely continue to make mistakes? But our hope is in Christ, and His grace is the motivating force that leads us to repentance. What if we yearned more to be salt and light in a decaying world of darkness, to love God and love people because He first loved us? What if we stopped seeing things as “us versus them”? We all come from dust, and to dust we will return. [reference Isaiah 58:1-14]

Okay, so I don’t have all the universal problem-solving answers for these questions, or fail-proof logistics on how to practically accomplish it all. Shouldn’t we, as believers in the greatest news in the world, be striving to operate a little more like this though? Shouldn’t we be engaging the world to push back the darkness? Love is not static, love moves. I mean, hasn’t this kind of thing worked in the past for numerous churches? Some people who have studied history would say yeah. I live in the “Bible Belt” though, which means we have to wade through a whole slew of people who are going to churches on Sunday just to punch their attendance clock, because for some reason down here you just go to church on Sunday. (It seems like a pretty lame hobby if that’s all it is. If it’s just a hobby you’re after, I’d rather get a boat and go out to the lake.) But we’re not after attendance, we’re after transformation. It’s not working if people aren’t being transformed. If you think this post is interesting or funny, but it doesn’t engage your heart and mind at all in any degree of a transforming nature… that’s a lose for me, that’s a loss for all of us.

Because really, what kingdom are we seeking? Are we seeking to enjoy and be a part of the extension of God’s kingdom, or trying to build our own little kingdom in fruitless vanity? Are we seeking the Father with reckless abandon; because we know that Christ doesn’t promise to make our life better, but He promises that He is better than life. Do we love God and want to know Him more? Do we want to play in His grace and work with grace-driven effort to build His great kingdom, not our own finite kingdom? Or are we constantly forgetting that all the Father has given us is not meant to terminate on ourselves? Are we still living with this amnesiac-type faith, forgetting that the Gospel is for our joy, even when we can’t see how in the moment; and our joy is not the purpose of the Gospel, but an inevitable outcome of it. Since the chief end of man is to enjoy God, and enjoy Him forever. Because we are far worse than we ever dared to believe, yet in Christ, we are far more loved than we ever imagined we could be.

“You are the salt of the earth, but if salt has lost its taste, how shall its saltiness be restored? It is no longer good for anything except to be thrown out and trampled under people’s feet. You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven.” – Matthew 5:13-16