Bill Haggling

If you’re looking to cut some expenses in your budget, never settle for “retail” or the first quoted price on certain monthly bills. It can be tough and sometimes take a long phone conversation or two, but haggling on some of your monthly service bills is a great way to save on your bills. If you haven’t already done this before, you ought to try calling one or more of your bill providers to ask for a better rate.

We have managed to get lower rates numerous times and kept almost all of our bills from increasing since Kat and I have been married. (For example, we only have Internet service and actually pay less now than when we originally signed up and they’ve quadrupled our download/upload speed since then.) Here are some ideas and tips to get you started:

Cable & Internet: Call your provider and simply ask for a better deal. Don’t be afraid to let them know you’re shopping around and have found better rates elsewhere, and even ask for the appropriate rep to cancel your service if you aren’t getting anywhere with the first person you speak with. Sometimes you just have to jump through a few hoops and prolong the phone call for them to just give in and magically find that lower rate.

Credit cards: Call your creditors and negotiate a lower interest rate using essentially the same principles as with your cable/internet service. Let them know you expect better rates/service or you will go elsewhere. (Credit card providers already make a killing on every single transaction because vendors have to pay small percentages on them, so they are just gouging you for additional revenue with high interest rates.)

Rent: This is not always possible, but it is definitely worth a shot every single time your rent lease is up. (We have managed to save thousands over the course of a year by haggling every year when the time came to renew our lease.)

Car insurance: Ask for a better rate or a discount (especially if you work from home), and inquire about all possible discounts available to you based on where you live, how much you drive, what type of car you own, etc. (We’ve never changed car insurance carriers because they have yet to be beaten when we actually have shopped around.)

Gym membership: Not an easy one and this is one of the most overpriced bills for most people, but if you go to a large chain gym like LA Fitness, Gold’s Gym, Lifetime, etc. then it’s always worth a shot to keep asking for a better deal. (We just use our local city gym in Allen, and there happens to be a free gym for me at my office, so we’ve managed to keep this cost way down.)

Costco Price Sign Information

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/e83/52332632/files/2014/12/img_2568-0.jpg

The price signs at Costco have a system and can clue you in on the available deals. If you’re a frequent shopper, this can help you save more money at the warehouse store if you pay attention.

In particular, look for:

• Prices that end in 97¢. (These have been marked down from the regular priced items, which end in 99¢.)

• Odd pricing, such as 79¢, 49¢, or 89¢. (These indicate specially priced items that Costco got a deal from the manufacturer. These can often be better deals than at other stores, but not usually better than the 97¢ markdown.)

• An asterisk* on the upper right side of the sign: The item won’t be reordered. (However this is not always true, sometimes the buyers are just rotating brands or it is a seasonal item.)

• 88¢ or .00 endings: Manager markdowns. (Sometimes the company uses these to move a product very fast.)

• Green signs mean the item/product is organic.

The Best Things You Can Do at Costco Without a Membership

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/e83/52332632/files/2014/12/img_2567.jpg

For those willing to pay the membership fee, Costco is a great place to buy in bulk and access a number of services. However, If you don’t want to pony up the cash ($55/year), there are still plenty of things you can take advantage of without a card.

1. Get your eyes checked: Costco stores have an optometrist on site and you can schedule an appointment whether you’re a member or not. The downside is that you need a membership to buy Costco’s offering of glasses, contact lenses, or other eye-wear.

2. Use a Costco Gift Card: As long as the gift card (which can go up to $1,000) is bought by someone with a membership, you can buy anything in the store. You can also use it to get into the store without a membership card.

3. Get medicine from the Pharmacy or Immunization Shots: You can get your prescription medicine at Costco too, but you still need a doctor’s note to fill it. Costco also offers immunizations without a membership.

4. Buy alcoholic beverages: Most states prohibit the forming of alcohol or tobacco “clubs”, so you can tell them at the door that you’re there to just buy alcohol and they should let you in.

5. Go window shopping: Tell the rep at the entrance looking for member cards that you would like to go to membership services and ask about joining. Once you’re at the service desk, get an application and ask to browse the store before making your decision.

6. Eat at the Food Court: Many Costcos have food courts outside the register area, so you can order whatever you like as long as you have cash (many of them now accept Amex/debit as well). If the food court is inside you can use an old gift card to get in or use the window shopping trick.

There are a lot of reasons to go to Costco, membership or not. It can be worth the time to find ways to save money, and if you want to take the plunge into a membership, there are a few items sold by Costco that can single-handedly pay for your Costco membership fee.